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  • 11 Dec 2017
    Hey everyone, shameless plug time!So I've recently begun to blog again after a fair old period of silence.There have been a LOT of changes for me in the last 3 months and I'm in the process of 'getting it all out' mainly for the catharsis.Honestly, your best bet, rather than me telling you here is just to read it from my blog page.I've updated the page layout and theme to improve readability and clarity, I think it looks much better now than it ever used to.So far, I'm keeping up with my 'Every Friday' schedule, so I'm hopefully not going to go missing again.And there are already not one, but two new posts on there for you all to get your teeth stuck into. Here is the First New PostHere is the Second New Post Hope to see you there!Luv-ya-lots,Samantha xx
    27 Posted by Samantha Smile
  • Hey everyone, shameless plug time!So I've recently begun to blog again after a fair old period of silence.There have been a LOT of changes for me in the last 3 months and I'm in the process of 'getting it all out' mainly for the catharsis.Honestly, your best bet, rather than me telling you here is just to read it from my blog page.I've updated the page layout and theme to improve readability and clarity, I think it looks much better now than it ever used to.So far, I'm keeping up with my 'Every Friday' schedule, so I'm hopefully not going to go missing again.And there are already not one, but two new posts on there for you all to get your teeth stuck into. Here is the First New PostHere is the Second New Post Hope to see you there!Luv-ya-lots,Samantha xx
    Dec 11, 2017 27
  • 07 Dec 2017
    Posted by Cristine Shye. BL   April 17, 2011 2:04 pm BST  1 comment   967 views An Example of Judicial Precedent R versus John Matthews The ruling which confirmed that vaginal rape of a transsexual woman may be prosecuted as rape October 1996 This important and under-reported ruling confirmed that non-consentual penile penetration of the surgically-constructed vagina of a transsexual woman can, in law, be rape if the other ingredients of the offence are satisfiedPrior to this ruling Vaginal rape was based on the legal, technical description and clinical make of a Gender born females Vagina.Which defence council were adamant that within the legal definition ‘’Vagina’ that a case of rape was not applicable as a surgically constructed vagina did not meet the clinical specifications and purpose of a natal born womans vagina, pleading that the charge be reduced to a lesser charge of indecent assault.The RH Judge Hooper ruledturn then to the question whether penetration of a male’s artificial vagina can constitute rape in the circumstances reflected by the admissions. Section 1 uses the word “person”. The words “whether vaginal or anal” relate to the intercourse. Indeed, the section might more happily read:“A man commits rape if (a) he has sexual intercourse (whether vaginal or anal) with a person”.Furthermore, rape being the non-consensual penile penetration of either of the two intimate orifices, I see no reason why, as a matter of public policy, that the offence is not committed.In conclusion, therefore, in my judgment, penile penetration of a male’s biological artificial vagina can, in law, constitute rape. There is no dispute that, having resolved the matter in this way, I should direct the jury that, as a matter of law, the penile penetration of this complainant’s vagina is rape if the other ingredients of the offence are satisfied. This was something, that had never been envisaged when drafting the GRA, that a transsexuals vagina was not included in the lawful description when it came to rape, this case law, precedent in law has overruled the clinical definition as far as the sexual offences act sect (1) vaginal rape. Rape is no longer gender specific under the sexual offences act now, it is an offence against the persons act rape, either anally or vaginally. I will try and include further interesting examples of case law in future publications, regarding Hight Court Judgements relating to the failures of Health Services and public bodies being found negligent or at fault when dealing with the Our particular community and the laws and our entitlements to fair and unbiased treatment. Cristine Jennifer Shye
  • Posted by Cristine Shye. BL   April 17, 2011 2:04 pm BST  1 comment   967 views An Example of Judicial Precedent R versus John Matthews The ruling which confirmed that vaginal rape of a transsexual woman may be prosecuted as rape October 1996 This important and under-reported ruling confirmed that non-consentual penile penetration of the surgically-constructed vagina of a transsexual woman can, in law, be rape if the other ingredients of the offence are satisfiedPrior to this ruling Vaginal rape was based on the legal, technical description and clinical make of a Gender born females Vagina.Which defence council were adamant that within the legal definition ‘’Vagina’ that a case of rape was not applicable as a surgically constructed vagina did not meet the clinical specifications and purpose of a natal born womans vagina, pleading that the charge be reduced to a lesser charge of indecent assault.The RH Judge Hooper ruledturn then to the question whether penetration of a male’s artificial vagina can constitute rape in the circumstances reflected by the admissions. Section 1 uses the word “person”. The words “whether vaginal or anal” relate to the intercourse. Indeed, the section might more happily read:“A man commits rape if (a) he has sexual intercourse (whether vaginal or anal) with a person”.Furthermore, rape being the non-consensual penile penetration of either of the two intimate orifices, I see no reason why, as a matter of public policy, that the offence is not committed.In conclusion, therefore, in my judgment, penile penetration of a male’s biological artificial vagina can, in law, constitute rape. There is no dispute that, having resolved the matter in this way, I should direct the jury that, as a matter of law, the penile penetration of this complainant’s vagina is rape if the other ingredients of the offence are satisfied. This was something, that had never been envisaged when drafting the GRA, that a transsexuals vagina was not included in the lawful description when it came to rape, this case law, precedent in law has overruled the clinical definition as far as the sexual offences act sect (1) vaginal rape. Rape is no longer gender specific under the sexual offences act now, it is an offence against the persons act rape, either anally or vaginally. I will try and include further interesting examples of case law in future publications, regarding Hight Court Judgements relating to the failures of Health Services and public bodies being found negligent or at fault when dealing with the Our particular community and the laws and our entitlements to fair and unbiased treatment. Cristine Jennifer Shye
    Dec 07, 2017 21
  • 07 Dec 2017
    Many anomalies such as AIS  (Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome) can arise causing inconsistent development between the various elements by which we know ourselves to be either a man or a women. Among the larger group embracing all these varieties, there is a small subgroup of individuals who experience gender varience The personal experience of this state is sometimes known as gender dysphoria (dysphoria means ‘unhappiness’). The impact of genetic and/or hormonal factors on their fetal development appears to cause parts of the brain to develop in a way which is inconsistent with their genitalia, gonads and, usually, with their chromosomes. This may give rise to another, rather different, example of XY women, that is, individuals whose visible physical sex appears to be that of a man, but whose brain has some female characteristics and whose gender identification is, therefore, that of a woman. Or, conversely, gender variance may occur the other way round. An individual having XX chromosomes and the visible physical sex of a female, may have some male brain characteristics and therefore, identify as a man. So the issue of one's gender identification, whether as a man or as a woman, or even neither (or both which occurs only rarely), is rooted in the brain, and is regarded by the individuals concerned, and is demonstrated by research, to be largely determined pre-birth and more or less stable thereafter.   Transexualism   Thus the experience of extreme gender variance is increasingly understood in scientific and medical disciplines as having a biological origin. The current medical viewpoint, based on the most up-to-date scientific research, is that this condition, which in its extreme manifestation is known as transexualism is strongly associated with unusual neurodevelopment of the brain at the fetal stage. Small areas of the brain are known to be distinctly different between males and females in the population generally. In those experiencing severe gender variance, some of these areas have been shown to develop in opposition to other sex characteristics and are, therefore, incongruent with the visible sex appearance.   Gender Variant Children   Very rarely, children may express this incongruence between gender identity and the genital sex, but their discomfort is not always easy to identify. Symptoms of unease with the assigned gender role and the visible sex appearance are often only apparent to the individuals concerned and may not be understood even by them. If these children are unable to articulate their unease, their discomfort may grow through adolescence and into adulthood, as their families and society, in ignorance of their underlying gender identity, relentlessly reinforce gender roles in accordance with their physical appearance alone. However, some children are able to express a strong cross-sex identification, and sometimes insist on living in the opposite role. In particular, the increasing disgust with the development of secondary sex characteristics experienced by young people during puberty may be taken as a strong indication that the condition will persist into adulthood as transsexualism. Therefore, in carefully screened individuals, hormone blocking treatment may be given, before pubertal changes become apparent, so that these young people have more time to decide in which gender role they can achieve lasting personal comfort. There is no evidence that raising children in contradiction to their visible sex characteristics causes gender variance, nor can the condition be overridden by raising children in strict accordance with a gender role that is consistent with their visible sex. Those who are not treated in adolescence may continue to struggle to conform; they may embark on relationships, marriages and parenthood in an attempt to lead ‘normal’ lives by suppressing their core gender identity. Ultimately, however, they may be unable to continue with the charade of presenting themselves as something they know they are not. The artificiality of their situation drives individuals to seek treatment to minimise the mismatch between the brain and the bodily appearance. They experience an overwhelming need to be complete, whole people and to live in accordance with their internal reality. Until this is achieved, the personal discomfort is such that it leads to great unhappiness and sometimes to suicidal feelings.   I have been meaning to consolidate and review a rather juvenile thesis I wrote aged 16 after being told I might have a condition called Reifenstein's syndrome, a form of Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS) at the age of 15.   Apart from having a penchant for dressing up in my sister’s clothes from an early age, I started noticing I was developing excess breast tissue at the age of about 14 - not the sort of breast tissue of a pre pubescent youth. More a soft feminine plumpness. AIS is not necessarily cognizant with gender dysphoria. After being taken to see numerous gender counselors, psychiatrists and gene specialists, finally one knew of someone else that was a specialist in AIS and Reifensteins syndrome, who referred me to the Gene clinic at Addenbrooks hospital in Cambridge. This is a rare condition, that in most cases, general GP’s and even gender therapists are unfamiliar with. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), also referred to as androgen resistance syndrome, is a set of disorders of sex development caused by mutations of the gene encoding the androgen receptor The set of resulting disorders varies according to the structure and sensitivity of the abnormal receptor. Most forms of AIS involve a variable degree of undervirilization and/or infertility in XY persons of any gender. A person with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) has a female external appearance despite a 46XY karyotype and undescended testes, a condition once called "testicular feminization" a phrase now considered both derogatory and inaccurate. Since 1990, major scientific advances have greatly expanded medical understanding and management of the molecular mechanisms of the clinical features of AIS. Importantly, advocacy groups for this and other intersex conditions have increased public awareness and spurred acceptance and understanding of the variable nature of gender identity. The value of accurate and scientifically detailed information for patients is now emphasized, with physicians no longer automatically recommending traditional surgical corrections, with elective options now viewed as a possible but no longer necessary intervention for ambiguous conditions. The incidence of complete AIS is about in 1 in 20,000. The incidence of lesser degrees of androgen resistance is unknown. It's been suggested by various authorities that it could be either more common or less common than complete AIS. Evidence suggests many cases of unexplained male infertility may be due to a mild degree of androgen resistance. Because the Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome gives rise to misleading between the genetic and the phenotypic gender, the convention is to designate a 46,XX individual as a genotypic female, and an 46,XY as a genotypic male. According to this convention, a person with Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome is a phenotypic female with a chromosomal genotype The Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome has been linked to mutations in AR, the gene for the human Androgen Receptor, located at Xq11-12 (i.e. on the X chromosome). Thus, it is an X-linked recessive trait, causing minimal or no effects in 46,XX people. Most individuals born with AIS have inherited their single X chromosome with its defective gene from their mother and may have siblings with the same disorder. Generally, inherited mutations effect siblings similarly, though different syndromes may occasionally manifest from the same mutation (carrier testing is now available for relatives at risk when a diagnosis of AIS is made in a family member). Over 100 AR mutations causing various forms of AIS have been recorded. The milder forms of AIS (4 and 5 in the list below) are caused by a simple missense mutation with a single codon/single amino acid difference, while complete and almost complete forms result from mutations that have a greater effect on the shape and structure of the protein. About one third of cases of AIS are new mutations rather than familial. A single case of CAIS attributed to an abnormality of the AF-1 coactivator (rather than AR itself) has been reported. Understanding the effects of androgen insensitivity begins with an understanding of the normal effects of testosterone in male and female development. The principal mammalian androgens are testosterone and its more potent metabolite, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The androgen receptor (AR) is a large protein of at least 910 amino acids. Each molecule consists of a portion which binds the androgen, a zinc finger portion that binds to DNA in steroid sensitive areas of nuclear chromatin, and an area that controls transcription. Testosterone diffuses from circulating blood into the cytoplasm of a target cell. Some is metabolized to estradiol, some reduced to DHT, and some remains as testosterone (T). Both T and DHT can bind and activate the androgen receptor, though DHT does so with more potent and prolonged effect. As DHT (or T) binds to the receptor, a portion of the protein is cleaved. The AR-DHT combination dimerizes by combining with a second AR-DHT, both are phosphorylated, and the entire complex moves into the cell nucleus and binds to androgen response elements on the promoter region of androgen-sensitive target genes. The transcription effect is amplified or inhibited by coactivators or corepressors. Although testosterone can be produced directly and indirectly from ovaries and adrenals later in life, the primary source of testosterone in early fetal life is the testes, and it plays a major role in human sexual differentiation. Before birth, testosterone induces the primary sex characteristics of males. At puberty, testosterone is primarily responsible for the secondary sex characteristics of males. The most common cause of AIS are point mutations in the androgen receptor gene resulting in a defective receptor protein which is unable to bind hormone or bind to DNA. Prenatal effects of testosterone in 46,XY fetusIn a normal fetus with a 46XY Because the Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome gives rise to misleading between the genetic and the phenotypic gender, the convention is to designate a 46,XX individual as a genotypic female, and an 46,XY as a genotypic male. According to this convention, a person with Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome is a phenotypic female with a chromosomal genotype of 46,XY. karyotype, the presence of the SRY gene induces testes to form on the genital ridges in the fetal abdomen a few weeks after conception. By 6 weeks of gestation, genital anatomies of XY and XX fetuses are still indistinguishable, consisting of a tiny underdeveloped button of tissue able to become a phallus, and a urogenital midline opening flanked by folds of skin able to become either labia or a scrotum. By the 7th week, fetal testes begin to produce testosterone and release it into the blood. Directly and as DHT, testosterone acts on the skin and tissues of the genital area and by 12 weeks of gestation, has produced a recognizable male, with a growing penis with a urethral opening at the tip, and a perineum fused and thinned into a scrotum, ready for the testes. Evidence suggests that this "remodeling" of the genitalia can only occur during this period of fetal life; if not complete by about 13 weeks, no amount of testosterone later will move the urethral opening or close the opening of the vagina. For the remainder of gestation, the principal known effect of testosterone and DHT is continued growth of the penis and internal wolffian derivatives (part of prostate, epididymis, seminal vesicles, and vas deferens). Early postnatal effects of testosterone in 46,XY infant’s Testosterone levels are low at birth but rise within weeks, remaining at normal male pubertal levels for about 2 months before declining to the low, barely detectable childhood levels. The biological function of this rise is unknown. Animal research suggests a contribution to brain differentiation. Pubertal effects of testosterone in 46,XY children At puberty, many of the early physical changes in both sexes are androgenic (adult-type body odor, increased oiliness of skin and hair, acne, pubic hair, axillary hair, fine upper lip and sideburn hair). As puberty progresses, later secondary sex characteristics in males are nearly entirely due to androgens (continued growth of the penis, maturation of spermatogenic tissue and fertility, beard, deeper voice, masculine jaw and musculature, body hair, heavier bones). In males, the major pubertal changes attributable to estradiol are growth acceleration, epiphyseal closure, termination of growth, and (if it occurs) gynecomastia.Variations produced by androgen insensitivity. Although many distinct mutations have been discovered, the spectrum of clinical manifestations has been divided into six phenotypes, which roughly correspond to increasing amounts of androgen effect due to increasing tissue responsiveness. It should be emphasized that some affected persons will have features that fall between the phenotypes described. 1. Complete AIS (CAIS): completely female body except no uterus, fallopian tubes or ovaries; testes in the abdomen; minimal androgenic (pubic or axillary) hair at puberty. 2. Partial or incomplete AIS (PAIS): male or female body, with slightly virilized genitalia or micropenis; testes in the abdomen; sparse to normal androgenic hair; mild to partial(MAIS) 3. Reifenstein syndrome: obviously ambiguous genitalia; small testes may be in abdomen or scrotum; sparse to normal androgenic hair; gynecomastia at puberty. 4. Infertile male syndrome: normal male genitalia internally and externally; normal male body or possible female androgyny, normal virilization and androgenic hair; reduced sperm production; reduced fertility or infertility. 5. Undervirilized fertile male syndrome: male internal and external genitalia with micropenis; testes in scrotum; normal androgenic hair; sperm count and fertility normal or reduced. 6. X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: normal or nearly normal male body and fertility; exaggerated adolescent gynecomastia; adult onset degenerative muscle disease. SYMPTOMS OF CAIS If a 46,XY fetus cannot respond to testosterone or DHT, only the non-androgenic aspects of male development begin to take place: formation of testes, production of testosterone and anti-müllerian hormone (AMH) by the testes, and suppression of müllerian ducts. The testes usually remain in the abdomen, or occasionally move into the inguinal canals but can go no further because there is no scrotum. AMH prevents the uterus and upper vagina from forming. The testes make male amounts of testosterone and DHT but no androgenic sexual differentiation occurs. Most of the prostate and other internal male genital ducts fail to form because of lack of testosterone action. A shallow vagina forms, surrounded by a normally-formed labia. Phallic tissue remains small and becomes a clitoris. At birth, a child with CAIS appears to be a typical girl, with no reason to suspect an incongruous karyotype and testosterone level, or lack of uterus. Childhood growth is normal and the karyotypic incongruity remains unsuspected unless an inguinal lump is discovered to be a testis during surgical repair of an inguinal hernia, appendectomy, or other coincidental surgery. Puberty tends to begin slightly later than the average for girls. As the hypothalamus and pituitary signal the testes to produce testosterone, amounts more often associated with boys begin to appear in the blood. Some of the testosterone is converted into estradiol, which begins to induce normal breast development. Normal reshaping of the pelvis and redistribution of body fat occurs as in other girls. Little or no pubic hair or other androgenic hair appears, sometimes a source of worry or shame. Acne is rare. As menarche typically occurs about two years after breast development begins, no one usually worries about lack of menstrual periods until a girl reaches 14 or 15 years of age. At that point, an astute physician may suspect the diagnosis just from the breast/hair discrepancy. Diagnosis of complete AIS is confirmed by discovering an adult male testosterone level, 46,XY karotype, and a shallow vagina with no cervix or uterus. Hormone measurements in pubertal girls and women with CAIS and PAIS are similar, and are characterized by total testosterone levels in the upper male rather than female range, estradiol levels mildly elevated above the female range, mildly elevated LH levels, normal FSH levels, sex hormone binding globulin levels in the female range, and possibly mild elevation of AMH. DHT levels are in the normal male range in CAIS but reportedly in the lower male range in PAIS. Interpretation of hormone levels in infancy is more complex and cannot be as easily summarized for this article. Androgen receptor testing has become available commercially but is rarely needed for diagnosis of CAIS and PAIS but more so for MAIS when ambiguity is more likely. To all intents and purposes, visibly at birth having normal genitalia I was perceived as a male. I received my test results from the Gene Clinic at Addenbrooks hospital in Cambridge 3 days after my 16th birthday, which I mentioned in my contribution to the then running article ''coming out'' in an earlier edition of the Tribune. I have recently been invited back to Addenbrooks to take part in DNA gene testing relating to my original gender dysphoria as recent studies indicate there might be links relating to what generally is considered a mental abnormality, and might in some cases actually be related to an abnormality in the make up of one’s DNA. © Cristine J Shye
  • Many anomalies such as AIS  (Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome) can arise causing inconsistent development between the various elements by which we know ourselves to be either a man or a women. Among the larger group embracing all these varieties, there is a small subgroup of individuals who experience gender varience The personal experience of this state is sometimes known as gender dysphoria (dysphoria means ‘unhappiness’). The impact of genetic and/or hormonal factors on their fetal development appears to cause parts of the brain to develop in a way which is inconsistent with their genitalia, gonads and, usually, with their chromosomes. This may give rise to another, rather different, example of XY women, that is, individuals whose visible physical sex appears to be that of a man, but whose brain has some female characteristics and whose gender identification is, therefore, that of a woman. Or, conversely, gender variance may occur the other way round. An individual having XX chromosomes and the visible physical sex of a female, may have some male brain characteristics and therefore, identify as a man. So the issue of one's gender identification, whether as a man or as a woman, or even neither (or both which occurs only rarely), is rooted in the brain, and is regarded by the individuals concerned, and is demonstrated by research, to be largely determined pre-birth and more or less stable thereafter.   Transexualism   Thus the experience of extreme gender variance is increasingly understood in scientific and medical disciplines as having a biological origin. The current medical viewpoint, based on the most up-to-date scientific research, is that this condition, which in its extreme manifestation is known as transexualism is strongly associated with unusual neurodevelopment of the brain at the fetal stage. Small areas of the brain are known to be distinctly different between males and females in the population generally. In those experiencing severe gender variance, some of these areas have been shown to develop in opposition to other sex characteristics and are, therefore, incongruent with the visible sex appearance.   Gender Variant Children   Very rarely, children may express this incongruence between gender identity and the genital sex, but their discomfort is not always easy to identify. Symptoms of unease with the assigned gender role and the visible sex appearance are often only apparent to the individuals concerned and may not be understood even by them. If these children are unable to articulate their unease, their discomfort may grow through adolescence and into adulthood, as their families and society, in ignorance of their underlying gender identity, relentlessly reinforce gender roles in accordance with their physical appearance alone. However, some children are able to express a strong cross-sex identification, and sometimes insist on living in the opposite role. In particular, the increasing disgust with the development of secondary sex characteristics experienced by young people during puberty may be taken as a strong indication that the condition will persist into adulthood as transsexualism. Therefore, in carefully screened individuals, hormone blocking treatment may be given, before pubertal changes become apparent, so that these young people have more time to decide in which gender role they can achieve lasting personal comfort. There is no evidence that raising children in contradiction to their visible sex characteristics causes gender variance, nor can the condition be overridden by raising children in strict accordance with a gender role that is consistent with their visible sex. Those who are not treated in adolescence may continue to struggle to conform; they may embark on relationships, marriages and parenthood in an attempt to lead ‘normal’ lives by suppressing their core gender identity. Ultimately, however, they may be unable to continue with the charade of presenting themselves as something they know they are not. The artificiality of their situation drives individuals to seek treatment to minimise the mismatch between the brain and the bodily appearance. They experience an overwhelming need to be complete, whole people and to live in accordance with their internal reality. Until this is achieved, the personal discomfort is such that it leads to great unhappiness and sometimes to suicidal feelings.   I have been meaning to consolidate and review a rather juvenile thesis I wrote aged 16 after being told I might have a condition called Reifenstein's syndrome, a form of Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS) at the age of 15.   Apart from having a penchant for dressing up in my sister’s clothes from an early age, I started noticing I was developing excess breast tissue at the age of about 14 - not the sort of breast tissue of a pre pubescent youth. More a soft feminine plumpness. AIS is not necessarily cognizant with gender dysphoria. After being taken to see numerous gender counselors, psychiatrists and gene specialists, finally one knew of someone else that was a specialist in AIS and Reifensteins syndrome, who referred me to the Gene clinic at Addenbrooks hospital in Cambridge. This is a rare condition, that in most cases, general GP’s and even gender therapists are unfamiliar with. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), also referred to as androgen resistance syndrome, is a set of disorders of sex development caused by mutations of the gene encoding the androgen receptor The set of resulting disorders varies according to the structure and sensitivity of the abnormal receptor. Most forms of AIS involve a variable degree of undervirilization and/or infertility in XY persons of any gender. A person with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) has a female external appearance despite a 46XY karyotype and undescended testes, a condition once called "testicular feminization" a phrase now considered both derogatory and inaccurate. Since 1990, major scientific advances have greatly expanded medical understanding and management of the molecular mechanisms of the clinical features of AIS. Importantly, advocacy groups for this and other intersex conditions have increased public awareness and spurred acceptance and understanding of the variable nature of gender identity. The value of accurate and scientifically detailed information for patients is now emphasized, with physicians no longer automatically recommending traditional surgical corrections, with elective options now viewed as a possible but no longer necessary intervention for ambiguous conditions. The incidence of complete AIS is about in 1 in 20,000. The incidence of lesser degrees of androgen resistance is unknown. It's been suggested by various authorities that it could be either more common or less common than complete AIS. Evidence suggests many cases of unexplained male infertility may be due to a mild degree of androgen resistance. Because the Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome gives rise to misleading between the genetic and the phenotypic gender, the convention is to designate a 46,XX individual as a genotypic female, and an 46,XY as a genotypic male. According to this convention, a person with Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome is a phenotypic female with a chromosomal genotype The Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome has been linked to mutations in AR, the gene for the human Androgen Receptor, located at Xq11-12 (i.e. on the X chromosome). Thus, it is an X-linked recessive trait, causing minimal or no effects in 46,XX people. Most individuals born with AIS have inherited their single X chromosome with its defective gene from their mother and may have siblings with the same disorder. Generally, inherited mutations effect siblings similarly, though different syndromes may occasionally manifest from the same mutation (carrier testing is now available for relatives at risk when a diagnosis of AIS is made in a family member). Over 100 AR mutations causing various forms of AIS have been recorded. The milder forms of AIS (4 and 5 in the list below) are caused by a simple missense mutation with a single codon/single amino acid difference, while complete and almost complete forms result from mutations that have a greater effect on the shape and structure of the protein. About one third of cases of AIS are new mutations rather than familial. A single case of CAIS attributed to an abnormality of the AF-1 coactivator (rather than AR itself) has been reported. Understanding the effects of androgen insensitivity begins with an understanding of the normal effects of testosterone in male and female development. The principal mammalian androgens are testosterone and its more potent metabolite, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The androgen receptor (AR) is a large protein of at least 910 amino acids. Each molecule consists of a portion which binds the androgen, a zinc finger portion that binds to DNA in steroid sensitive areas of nuclear chromatin, and an area that controls transcription. Testosterone diffuses from circulating blood into the cytoplasm of a target cell. Some is metabolized to estradiol, some reduced to DHT, and some remains as testosterone (T). Both T and DHT can bind and activate the androgen receptor, though DHT does so with more potent and prolonged effect. As DHT (or T) binds to the receptor, a portion of the protein is cleaved. The AR-DHT combination dimerizes by combining with a second AR-DHT, both are phosphorylated, and the entire complex moves into the cell nucleus and binds to androgen response elements on the promoter region of androgen-sensitive target genes. The transcription effect is amplified or inhibited by coactivators or corepressors. Although testosterone can be produced directly and indirectly from ovaries and adrenals later in life, the primary source of testosterone in early fetal life is the testes, and it plays a major role in human sexual differentiation. Before birth, testosterone induces the primary sex characteristics of males. At puberty, testosterone is primarily responsible for the secondary sex characteristics of males. The most common cause of AIS are point mutations in the androgen receptor gene resulting in a defective receptor protein which is unable to bind hormone or bind to DNA. Prenatal effects of testosterone in 46,XY fetusIn a normal fetus with a 46XY Because the Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome gives rise to misleading between the genetic and the phenotypic gender, the convention is to designate a 46,XX individual as a genotypic female, and an 46,XY as a genotypic male. According to this convention, a person with Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome is a phenotypic female with a chromosomal genotype of 46,XY. karyotype, the presence of the SRY gene induces testes to form on the genital ridges in the fetal abdomen a few weeks after conception. By 6 weeks of gestation, genital anatomies of XY and XX fetuses are still indistinguishable, consisting of a tiny underdeveloped button of tissue able to become a phallus, and a urogenital midline opening flanked by folds of skin able to become either labia or a scrotum. By the 7th week, fetal testes begin to produce testosterone and release it into the blood. Directly and as DHT, testosterone acts on the skin and tissues of the genital area and by 12 weeks of gestation, has produced a recognizable male, with a growing penis with a urethral opening at the tip, and a perineum fused and thinned into a scrotum, ready for the testes. Evidence suggests that this "remodeling" of the genitalia can only occur during this period of fetal life; if not complete by about 13 weeks, no amount of testosterone later will move the urethral opening or close the opening of the vagina. For the remainder of gestation, the principal known effect of testosterone and DHT is continued growth of the penis and internal wolffian derivatives (part of prostate, epididymis, seminal vesicles, and vas deferens). Early postnatal effects of testosterone in 46,XY infant’s Testosterone levels are low at birth but rise within weeks, remaining at normal male pubertal levels for about 2 months before declining to the low, barely detectable childhood levels. The biological function of this rise is unknown. Animal research suggests a contribution to brain differentiation. Pubertal effects of testosterone in 46,XY children At puberty, many of the early physical changes in both sexes are androgenic (adult-type body odor, increased oiliness of skin and hair, acne, pubic hair, axillary hair, fine upper lip and sideburn hair). As puberty progresses, later secondary sex characteristics in males are nearly entirely due to androgens (continued growth of the penis, maturation of spermatogenic tissue and fertility, beard, deeper voice, masculine jaw and musculature, body hair, heavier bones). In males, the major pubertal changes attributable to estradiol are growth acceleration, epiphyseal closure, termination of growth, and (if it occurs) gynecomastia.Variations produced by androgen insensitivity. Although many distinct mutations have been discovered, the spectrum of clinical manifestations has been divided into six phenotypes, which roughly correspond to increasing amounts of androgen effect due to increasing tissue responsiveness. It should be emphasized that some affected persons will have features that fall between the phenotypes described. 1. Complete AIS (CAIS): completely female body except no uterus, fallopian tubes or ovaries; testes in the abdomen; minimal androgenic (pubic or axillary) hair at puberty. 2. Partial or incomplete AIS (PAIS): male or female body, with slightly virilized genitalia or micropenis; testes in the abdomen; sparse to normal androgenic hair; mild to partial(MAIS) 3. Reifenstein syndrome: obviously ambiguous genitalia; small testes may be in abdomen or scrotum; sparse to normal androgenic hair; gynecomastia at puberty. 4. Infertile male syndrome: normal male genitalia internally and externally; normal male body or possible female androgyny, normal virilization and androgenic hair; reduced sperm production; reduced fertility or infertility. 5. Undervirilized fertile male syndrome: male internal and external genitalia with micropenis; testes in scrotum; normal androgenic hair; sperm count and fertility normal or reduced. 6. X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: normal or nearly normal male body and fertility; exaggerated adolescent gynecomastia; adult onset degenerative muscle disease. SYMPTOMS OF CAIS If a 46,XY fetus cannot respond to testosterone or DHT, only the non-androgenic aspects of male development begin to take place: formation of testes, production of testosterone and anti-müllerian hormone (AMH) by the testes, and suppression of müllerian ducts. The testes usually remain in the abdomen, or occasionally move into the inguinal canals but can go no further because there is no scrotum. AMH prevents the uterus and upper vagina from forming. The testes make male amounts of testosterone and DHT but no androgenic sexual differentiation occurs. Most of the prostate and other internal male genital ducts fail to form because of lack of testosterone action. A shallow vagina forms, surrounded by a normally-formed labia. Phallic tissue remains small and becomes a clitoris. At birth, a child with CAIS appears to be a typical girl, with no reason to suspect an incongruous karyotype and testosterone level, or lack of uterus. Childhood growth is normal and the karyotypic incongruity remains unsuspected unless an inguinal lump is discovered to be a testis during surgical repair of an inguinal hernia, appendectomy, or other coincidental surgery. Puberty tends to begin slightly later than the average for girls. As the hypothalamus and pituitary signal the testes to produce testosterone, amounts more often associated with boys begin to appear in the blood. Some of the testosterone is converted into estradiol, which begins to induce normal breast development. Normal reshaping of the pelvis and redistribution of body fat occurs as in other girls. Little or no pubic hair or other androgenic hair appears, sometimes a source of worry or shame. Acne is rare. As menarche typically occurs about two years after breast development begins, no one usually worries about lack of menstrual periods until a girl reaches 14 or 15 years of age. At that point, an astute physician may suspect the diagnosis just from the breast/hair discrepancy. Diagnosis of complete AIS is confirmed by discovering an adult male testosterone level, 46,XY karotype, and a shallow vagina with no cervix or uterus. Hormone measurements in pubertal girls and women with CAIS and PAIS are similar, and are characterized by total testosterone levels in the upper male rather than female range, estradiol levels mildly elevated above the female range, mildly elevated LH levels, normal FSH levels, sex hormone binding globulin levels in the female range, and possibly mild elevation of AMH. DHT levels are in the normal male range in CAIS but reportedly in the lower male range in PAIS. Interpretation of hormone levels in infancy is more complex and cannot be as easily summarized for this article. Androgen receptor testing has become available commercially but is rarely needed for diagnosis of CAIS and PAIS but more so for MAIS when ambiguity is more likely. To all intents and purposes, visibly at birth having normal genitalia I was perceived as a male. I received my test results from the Gene Clinic at Addenbrooks hospital in Cambridge 3 days after my 16th birthday, which I mentioned in my contribution to the then running article ''coming out'' in an earlier edition of the Tribune. I have recently been invited back to Addenbrooks to take part in DNA gene testing relating to my original gender dysphoria as recent studies indicate there might be links relating to what generally is considered a mental abnormality, and might in some cases actually be related to an abnormality in the make up of one’s DNA. © Cristine J Shye
    Dec 07, 2017 18
  • 04 Dec 2017
    For most of the six-billion people who occupy this planet few things in our ever evolving lives are completely static, completely unchanging and rigid. Hardly ever do we give second thought to the things we believe are static and cannot change, but are we correct in assuming that anything in our life is permanent? The relation of gender (our mental constructions of being male or female [or perhaps even neither[or both bi-gender]) to sex (the anatomy of our bodies) can be such a thing. Although throughout our life the world around us, that which is immediate and that which is distant, ebbs like tides, ever-changing, we know so well that some things – such as our bodies – will always remain familiar. We may move between jobs, between cities or nations, even friends come and go, but we do not fear ever waking to find ourselves in a new body, with a new sex, or even with a new sense of gender. This though is only what we think is true. There are some people though, unmentioned, often unseen or forgotten, perceived as alien: like strangers in a strange world who we feel incapable of relating to. The intersex, the transsexual, drag queens and drag kings, even cross dressers deconstruct that which we may feel can never be questioned: how our perception of sex and gender seem to be linked; if I feel male then I am male and if I am male then I must feel male. Yet the truth is that our physical sex, and the more personal gender, are capable of becoming disjointed with one another. It is through the individuals previously mentioned though where we may find that which we felt so sure of before, our bodies, may in fact be no more immalleable than our dress styles. For it is from these people and out of their stories that we should recognize the often unseen truth behind sex and gender: that both are neither static, but are rather dynamic identities that are not only capable of change but capable of remodeling over-and-over throughout all of our lives.   You get home at the end of a long day at work. You come inside, scoff down some food, and decide its time to hit the hay. You head to the bathroom and as you brush those pearly whites, you stare into the mirror and see somebody staring right back at you., sometimes that person is an exact replica of you; a backwards version of that good lookin’ self you remember. Other times though, you see some stranger staring right back. This person doesn’t look like you at all. This person looks too thick, too thin, you see a pudgy stomach where you once imagined washboard abs, you see blemishes, the wrong hair color, the wrong eye color, the wrong image, the wrong person. Now imagine that every single time you looked into that mirror the wrong person was staring back. You just could not find a way to relate to that reflection. For individuals who were born with an intersexed condition, this is exactly how we as transsexuals can feel every single day. Our Society is based on two binaries. First is the sex binary that inevitably leads to a gender binary. It leads us to believe that there are two sexes, male and female which relate to the body and these sexes must adhere to their assumed genders, man or woman. Men act masculine and women act feminine. Almost every aspect of our culture has been separated to fit into either category. Things are either masculine or feminine and the system usually discourages people from mixing gender roles. For the majority of the population, we except this system and believe that bodies can only come in two forms and these forms follow their norms. What that majority doesn’t realize is that there is the possibility to be neither male nor female or both male and female or somewhere in between. One of these categories of people that do not fall into the categories of the sex binary those who are born intersexed. Immediately after birth, we are categorized as either male or female. But there is a large percentage (1 in 2000) whose biological sex cannot be classified. These individuals are known as intersexed (Wilchins, 72). Chromosomal and hormonal irregularities can cause a new born to have atypical, and usually ambiguous, genitalia and gonads. For many years, surgical procedures have been performed soon after birth in order to build a less ambiguous looking genitalia allowing for easier classification. The doctors would usually assign a sex as quickly as possible. More often than not, the child was assigned to be a female because it is an easier procedure (Beck). Once the aesthetics of the genitalia have been normalized, the parents would then raise their child as a female. The problem with this is that often the child will have a hormonal imbalance and genitalia that does not function fully causing for much confusion as the child reaches puberty and onward. Intersexed individuals are one of the many groups that suffer through our social construct of a sex and gender binary because they are forced into living a life as a sex and gender other than their own. They are forced to live a life identifying as either male or female because a third or forth or even fifth option is not available.
  • For most of the six-billion people who occupy this planet few things in our ever evolving lives are completely static, completely unchanging and rigid. Hardly ever do we give second thought to the things we believe are static and cannot change, but are we correct in assuming that anything in our life is permanent? The relation of gender (our mental constructions of being male or female [or perhaps even neither[or both bi-gender]) to sex (the anatomy of our bodies) can be such a thing. Although throughout our life the world around us, that which is immediate and that which is distant, ebbs like tides, ever-changing, we know so well that some things – such as our bodies – will always remain familiar. We may move between jobs, between cities or nations, even friends come and go, but we do not fear ever waking to find ourselves in a new body, with a new sex, or even with a new sense of gender. This though is only what we think is true. There are some people though, unmentioned, often unseen or forgotten, perceived as alien: like strangers in a strange world who we feel incapable of relating to. The intersex, the transsexual, drag queens and drag kings, even cross dressers deconstruct that which we may feel can never be questioned: how our perception of sex and gender seem to be linked; if I feel male then I am male and if I am male then I must feel male. Yet the truth is that our physical sex, and the more personal gender, are capable of becoming disjointed with one another. It is through the individuals previously mentioned though where we may find that which we felt so sure of before, our bodies, may in fact be no more immalleable than our dress styles. For it is from these people and out of their stories that we should recognize the often unseen truth behind sex and gender: that both are neither static, but are rather dynamic identities that are not only capable of change but capable of remodeling over-and-over throughout all of our lives.   You get home at the end of a long day at work. You come inside, scoff down some food, and decide its time to hit the hay. You head to the bathroom and as you brush those pearly whites, you stare into the mirror and see somebody staring right back at you., sometimes that person is an exact replica of you; a backwards version of that good lookin’ self you remember. Other times though, you see some stranger staring right back. This person doesn’t look like you at all. This person looks too thick, too thin, you see a pudgy stomach where you once imagined washboard abs, you see blemishes, the wrong hair color, the wrong eye color, the wrong image, the wrong person. Now imagine that every single time you looked into that mirror the wrong person was staring back. You just could not find a way to relate to that reflection. For individuals who were born with an intersexed condition, this is exactly how we as transsexuals can feel every single day. Our Society is based on two binaries. First is the sex binary that inevitably leads to a gender binary. It leads us to believe that there are two sexes, male and female which relate to the body and these sexes must adhere to their assumed genders, man or woman. Men act masculine and women act feminine. Almost every aspect of our culture has been separated to fit into either category. Things are either masculine or feminine and the system usually discourages people from mixing gender roles. For the majority of the population, we except this system and believe that bodies can only come in two forms and these forms follow their norms. What that majority doesn’t realize is that there is the possibility to be neither male nor female or both male and female or somewhere in between. One of these categories of people that do not fall into the categories of the sex binary those who are born intersexed. Immediately after birth, we are categorized as either male or female. But there is a large percentage (1 in 2000) whose biological sex cannot be classified. These individuals are known as intersexed (Wilchins, 72). Chromosomal and hormonal irregularities can cause a new born to have atypical, and usually ambiguous, genitalia and gonads. For many years, surgical procedures have been performed soon after birth in order to build a less ambiguous looking genitalia allowing for easier classification. The doctors would usually assign a sex as quickly as possible. More often than not, the child was assigned to be a female because it is an easier procedure (Beck). Once the aesthetics of the genitalia have been normalized, the parents would then raise their child as a female. The problem with this is that often the child will have a hormonal imbalance and genitalia that does not function fully causing for much confusion as the child reaches puberty and onward. Intersexed individuals are one of the many groups that suffer through our social construct of a sex and gender binary because they are forced into living a life as a sex and gender other than their own. They are forced to live a life identifying as either male or female because a third or forth or even fifth option is not available.
    Dec 04, 2017 40
  • 04 Dec 2017
    Religion, do I need it Whilst the current thread is religion thought i would add this.I once got religion, dragged Cass to our local church, We underwent an interview on suitability for acceptance. Pastor asked us a lot of intimate and personal questions, could see he was getting quite excited by our responses, but suddenly he got serious, told us we would have to change, desist from unatural practices and be celibate if we wanted to join his congregation.Reluctantly, desperate for eternal salvation I made the requisite promises, Every Sunday we would troll down to the church, sing and pray and be joyful. After some 4-5 weeks, the pastor took us to one side, and asked us if we were practicing celibacy and abstinence, I had to admit we were practicing but had not perfected it, going on to relate how one time I bent down to pick up a tin of paint, my mini skirt rode up over my bum, revealing my thong clad rear, Cass being unable to hold herself in check any longer, grabbed me and entered me, we had rampant sex there and then. The Pastor exclaimed with some venom and disgust, that we were sinners beyond redemption, after a very poignant pause, he said ''Get out of here, your not welcome here anymore''............................................................................................................Funny that, thats exactly what the manager said in the Do It yourself store, where we had gone to buy the paint.
  • Religion, do I need it Whilst the current thread is religion thought i would add this.I once got religion, dragged Cass to our local church, We underwent an interview on suitability for acceptance. Pastor asked us a lot of intimate and personal questions, could see he was getting quite excited by our responses, but suddenly he got serious, told us we would have to change, desist from unatural practices and be celibate if we wanted to join his congregation.Reluctantly, desperate for eternal salvation I made the requisite promises, Every Sunday we would troll down to the church, sing and pray and be joyful. After some 4-5 weeks, the pastor took us to one side, and asked us if we were practicing celibacy and abstinence, I had to admit we were practicing but had not perfected it, going on to relate how one time I bent down to pick up a tin of paint, my mini skirt rode up over my bum, revealing my thong clad rear, Cass being unable to hold herself in check any longer, grabbed me and entered me, we had rampant sex there and then. The Pastor exclaimed with some venom and disgust, that we were sinners beyond redemption, after a very poignant pause, he said ''Get out of here, your not welcome here anymore''............................................................................................................Funny that, thats exactly what the manager said in the Do It yourself store, where we had gone to buy the paint.
    Dec 04, 2017 25
  • 04 Dec 2017
    Oh lord, Please give me the serenity to accept that which I cannot change. The tenacity and courage to change the things I cannot accept Give me the guile and fortitude to conceal succesfully the bodies of the people I killed today for pissing me off. Keep me mindful wonderrous god,, not to tread on the toes attached to the arses i might have to kiss tomorow. Should I be tempted, remind me that a man is like mascara, first sign of emnotion and it runs. But fill me with cheer that life is not always an uphill struggle, sometimes we choose the slippery downwards slope and end up back  in the shit we were striving to get out of in the first place. Make me always aware that it take 42 muscles to frown add another 14 arguing, when realy all it needs is 4, to extend an arm, clench a fist and wack the bombastic biggots in the mouth for winding me up. And most important, please confirm that, a profile, saying, guy, looking for convincing tranny, they must be very discreet, can't accommodate, limited travel, your place, = lying married cheating toad AND remember we are all in the same boat,   we might be on different decks, but if the boat sinks, WE ALL get stuffed
  • Oh lord, Please give me the serenity to accept that which I cannot change. The tenacity and courage to change the things I cannot accept Give me the guile and fortitude to conceal succesfully the bodies of the people I killed today for pissing me off. Keep me mindful wonderrous god,, not to tread on the toes attached to the arses i might have to kiss tomorow. Should I be tempted, remind me that a man is like mascara, first sign of emnotion and it runs. But fill me with cheer that life is not always an uphill struggle, sometimes we choose the slippery downwards slope and end up back  in the shit we were striving to get out of in the first place. Make me always aware that it take 42 muscles to frown add another 14 arguing, when realy all it needs is 4, to extend an arm, clench a fist and wack the bombastic biggots in the mouth for winding me up. And most important, please confirm that, a profile, saying, guy, looking for convincing tranny, they must be very discreet, can't accommodate, limited travel, your place, = lying married cheating toad AND remember we are all in the same boat,   we might be on different decks, but if the boat sinks, WE ALL get stuffed
    Dec 04, 2017 27

Top Blogs

  • 18 Dec 2014
    The Gender Clinic   2009 I had decided enough was enough. I needed help with this horrid transgendered curse which was doing its best to wreck my life. First stop GP. She was great. Second stop a selection of shrinks who referred me to the Gender Clinic as well as diagnosing me as pretty mental. First appointment was a long wait. But when it came it was quite nice being able to spill my guts out to an expert. I think I've been maybe 6 times now. During this period I've changed my name am dosed up on high levels of hormones and lifes great.   A Summary Of Yesterdays Appointment   I love hormones. The serenity from having near zero testosterone in my body. My bits don't work at all anymore which I couldn't care less about. I cannot be arsed with having my bits cut off and i don't like fannies anyway. I'm very single because I haven't got a clue about my sexual orientation and I'm not going to inflict that on anyone, but I do have a cat. People don't treat me as female, but they don't treat me as male either, i'm just different, which I like. I've had mainly very positive reactions to my gender choices. I am reintegrated into regular society. I'm no longer a webcam 'girl'.  My body has become very feminine which does confuse people. Sometimes I wear makeup and a hairpiece sometimes I don't, depends on my mood. Basically I'm a contented little tranny.   Bye Bye   So I'm exactly where I want to be with it all. The happiest I have been in years. So subsequently I have been told I don't have to go anymore. Their job is done, GP still deals with blood tests, hormones etc but thats it. I guess I'm what they would describe as a success story. So apart from one incident in there I have to say thanks to them as they have really helped me turn my life around.
    37 Posted by Mia Wallace
  • The Gender Clinic   2009 I had decided enough was enough. I needed help with this horrid transgendered curse which was doing its best to wreck my life. First stop GP. She was great. Second stop a selection of shrinks who referred me to the Gender Clinic as well as diagnosing me as pretty mental. First appointment was a long wait. But when it came it was quite nice being able to spill my guts out to an expert. I think I've been maybe 6 times now. During this period I've changed my name am dosed up on high levels of hormones and lifes great.   A Summary Of Yesterdays Appointment   I love hormones. The serenity from having near zero testosterone in my body. My bits don't work at all anymore which I couldn't care less about. I cannot be arsed with having my bits cut off and i don't like fannies anyway. I'm very single because I haven't got a clue about my sexual orientation and I'm not going to inflict that on anyone, but I do have a cat. People don't treat me as female, but they don't treat me as male either, i'm just different, which I like. I've had mainly very positive reactions to my gender choices. I am reintegrated into regular society. I'm no longer a webcam 'girl'.  My body has become very feminine which does confuse people. Sometimes I wear makeup and a hairpiece sometimes I don't, depends on my mood. Basically I'm a contented little tranny.   Bye Bye   So I'm exactly where I want to be with it all. The happiest I have been in years. So subsequently I have been told I don't have to go anymore. Their job is done, GP still deals with blood tests, hormones etc but thats it. I guess I'm what they would describe as a success story. So apart from one incident in there I have to say thanks to them as they have really helped me turn my life around.
    Dec 18, 2014 37
  • 13 Oct 2013
    Is it me?   Well not sure how to put this but here goes. Is it me or does anyone else feel that those who have gone through the full transition Don’t feel they fit in any more I have had 2 friends who have had the full transition and have left here Due to the way they are spoken to and both have a gone through what a lot of us are aiming to do And have great advice and are both counselling other trans girls in different stages of the journey I know they do as I do think in some way this fabulous site has taken a turn to more Fetish Cross Dressing which yes is all part of the trans scene in ways. 50 shades of grey doesn’t cut it here it’s more like 500 shades of grey lol But I do feel upset that friends and other post op girls who yes are now women feel they don’t belong I do say live and let live for all walks of life but it does come to a shock in ways to me that We have in a word discrimination against each other here Why can’t we all get along I have said before in the immortal words of high school musical   “We’re all in this together” so let’s start being united in what we do To quote a friend who has left “Peace love and lip gloss” Hugs xxamyxx 
    35 Posted by Amymichelle Morris
  • Is it me?   Well not sure how to put this but here goes. Is it me or does anyone else feel that those who have gone through the full transition Don’t feel they fit in any more I have had 2 friends who have had the full transition and have left here Due to the way they are spoken to and both have a gone through what a lot of us are aiming to do And have great advice and are both counselling other trans girls in different stages of the journey I know they do as I do think in some way this fabulous site has taken a turn to more Fetish Cross Dressing which yes is all part of the trans scene in ways. 50 shades of grey doesn’t cut it here it’s more like 500 shades of grey lol But I do feel upset that friends and other post op girls who yes are now women feel they don’t belong I do say live and let live for all walks of life but it does come to a shock in ways to me that We have in a word discrimination against each other here Why can’t we all get along I have said before in the immortal words of high school musical   “We’re all in this together” so let’s start being united in what we do To quote a friend who has left “Peace love and lip gloss” Hugs xxamyxx 
    Oct 13, 2013 35
  • 24 Jan 2014
    hi ya just asking i do love albumn suggestions and like looking at pics but please if ya have ya knob out please dont suggest as i like girly shots clothes and make up so you look nice a cock in stockings aint girly . i dont mind if you are into that and dressing is a fetish each to their own    live and let live i say  i dress because i love being a girl i know im a guy (a cock in a frock lol) but i like the illusion  thats why i tuck it away      but i cant or wont hit the like button because ya got ya dangleys out lol and i dont want to appear rude by not liking it so its best all round    big hugs and to coin a phrase a friend of mine uses   peace love and lipgloss xxxxxxx   xxamyxx
    31 Posted by Amymichelle Morris
  • hi ya just asking i do love albumn suggestions and like looking at pics but please if ya have ya knob out please dont suggest as i like girly shots clothes and make up so you look nice a cock in stockings aint girly . i dont mind if you are into that and dressing is a fetish each to their own    live and let live i say  i dress because i love being a girl i know im a guy (a cock in a frock lol) but i like the illusion  thats why i tuck it away      but i cant or wont hit the like button because ya got ya dangleys out lol and i dont want to appear rude by not liking it so its best all round    big hugs and to coin a phrase a friend of mine uses   peace love and lipgloss xxxxxxx   xxamyxx
    Jan 24, 2014 31
  • 14 Mar 2015
    Well today has been somewhat different for me, not only was it my mum's Birthday, but i also took her into The Village for a few drinks this afternoon and then onto velvet for a lovely Birthday meal, I had been promising to take her into Manchester for a long time - So I thought why not!  And yes before you ask, i was in girlie mode. Mum has known about Liz for quite a while now and is very comfortable with the Trans side of me and is always asking if I've bought any new clothes, and most of all hates how good my legs look! I chat to my mum everyday whether that is by text or a phone call, i always do, the thing is my mum like all of your parents and those close to you are not getting any younger, you should always grab the chance to speak to them whenever you can and spend as much time as you can with them. OK today was not the usual party atmosphere that we are accustomed to when we pop into the village on a Saturday, but more of a qualitiy precious time spent chatting in a relaxed environment with the woman who brought me into this world, helping "MUM" celebrate her birthday with Liz and not Ian.  Her words to me as I've just dropped her off at home " I have loved every second of today" like i said quality time.    Myself and Mum in Paddy's  And Mum enjoying another Cider in Via. So folks, wht not get yourselves off out and enjoy the preicous time while you can, you never know what's round the corner. Hugs  Liz and Marion (Mum) x
  • Well today has been somewhat different for me, not only was it my mum's Birthday, but i also took her into The Village for a few drinks this afternoon and then onto velvet for a lovely Birthday meal, I had been promising to take her into Manchester for a long time - So I thought why not!  And yes before you ask, i was in girlie mode. Mum has known about Liz for quite a while now and is very comfortable with the Trans side of me and is always asking if I've bought any new clothes, and most of all hates how good my legs look! I chat to my mum everyday whether that is by text or a phone call, i always do, the thing is my mum like all of your parents and those close to you are not getting any younger, you should always grab the chance to speak to them whenever you can and spend as much time as you can with them. OK today was not the usual party atmosphere that we are accustomed to when we pop into the village on a Saturday, but more of a qualitiy precious time spent chatting in a relaxed environment with the woman who brought me into this world, helping "MUM" celebrate her birthday with Liz and not Ian.  Her words to me as I've just dropped her off at home " I have loved every second of today" like i said quality time.    Myself and Mum in Paddy's  And Mum enjoying another Cider in Via. So folks, wht not get yourselves off out and enjoy the preicous time while you can, you never know what's round the corner. Hugs  Liz and Marion (Mum) x
    Mar 14, 2015 27
  • 16 Aug 2015
    Ok I know this blog isn't full of cock shots and all things kinky - but hey it is a little different! Yesterday myself and Shar went to a wedding reception and in my moment of madness I said "fuck it I'm going in girlie mode". So I started getting ready to the amusement of Shar, saying people won't know where to look, anyway I got ready and off we went, presant in hand. I wasn't feeling nervous, just good to be getting out again, although in a very straight and normal atmosphere. We arrived and I walk straight in greeted Sammy the bride and her new husband, to her amazement it was me Ian - but Liz! Having a mingle with the muggels and a chat to work colleagues, to my amazement no one actually read me apart from my work mates, who knew about Liz but had never actually met for real, apart from my ill fitting shoes being to big - yes to big I had a pleasant evening and it was a change from the norm! The moral to my blog is, if you dress with right attitude then why can't all of you lovely girls get out there and burst the bubble! Till next time, Hugs Liz x
  • Ok I know this blog isn't full of cock shots and all things kinky - but hey it is a little different! Yesterday myself and Shar went to a wedding reception and in my moment of madness I said "fuck it I'm going in girlie mode". So I started getting ready to the amusement of Shar, saying people won't know where to look, anyway I got ready and off we went, presant in hand. I wasn't feeling nervous, just good to be getting out again, although in a very straight and normal atmosphere. We arrived and I walk straight in greeted Sammy the bride and her new husband, to her amazement it was me Ian - but Liz! Having a mingle with the muggels and a chat to work colleagues, to my amazement no one actually read me apart from my work mates, who knew about Liz but had never actually met for real, apart from my ill fitting shoes being to big - yes to big I had a pleasant evening and it was a change from the norm! The moral to my blog is, if you dress with right attitude then why can't all of you lovely girls get out there and burst the bubble! Till next time, Hugs Liz x
    Aug 16, 2015 27
  • 26 Jul 2015
    Preparing for “D-Day” (“D” for “Disclosure”)   Stratford on Avon  May 2015  After Christmas I decided I was going to live out the rest of my life as a woman on a 24/7 basis.  I’m 70 next year and it was ‘now or never’.  For nearly 9 months I had been living as a woman at home and when out and about in the nearby towns but had not ‘come out’ to my friends and acquaintances in the village where I live.   I went dressed as a man when I disclosed my transgenderism to my (lady) doctor but took some photos with me, some dating back more than 50 years, so I could satisfy her this wasn’t just a recent phenomenon and that I hadn’t gone doolally because of my wife’s death early last year.   She was bowled over by the photos and asked me if I would give her make-up lessons so she could look 20 years younger too!    She immediately acceded to my request for a referral to the gender identity clinic (GIC) but then she had no option really, as there are strict NHS protocols and guidelines concerning transgender matters. As luck would have it, my local GIC was immediately next door in the ‘cottage’ hospital on the same campus as my doctor’s surgery; wasn’t I a lucky girl?  This hasn’t quickened up in the slightest the inordinately slow GIC process though.   She also changed my male name on the NHS records to that of my unofficially adopted female name and the NHS now only knows me as a female named Ms Trines Ward. All correspondence comes in that name. Any male doctor wishing to examine me must wheel in a female chaperone for my protection!  Recently I had an emergency operation and the hospital kept insisting I had to be put in a female ward; I only just managed to avoid this as I felt ill women and their visitors would not want to see me in the next bed without wig or make-up! In the male ward I wore androgynous pink and blue short pyjamas but the board above my bed clearly stated ‘Ms Trines Ward—female” as did the labels around my arm and ankle, and the staff punctiliously referred to me amongst staff and patients, as ‘she’ or ‘her’.   Back at the GIC, they informed me it was run by two psychiatrists and I would need a separate assessment consultation with each one before any treatment would be considered. There was a four months’ wait for each session which meant nothing could even begin to happen until October/November!  I thought this was completely out of order and I thoroughly read the two main published guidelines (both are on the net):   1. “Good practice guidelines for the assessment and treatment of adults with gender dysphoria” ref CR181 published by Royal College of Pyschiatrists Oct 2013   2) “Gender dysphoria services: a guide for General Practitioners and other healthcare staff” published by NHS.   These showed me my GIC’s timescales did not comply and some polite but firm letters and phone calls from me got the waits reduced to two months each; still lengthy but within the guidelines.  I can understand caution when dealing with tyros in their late teens/early twenties who might not even have ventured out dressed in public but not when dealing with very long in the tooth, fully experienced trans like me who know precisely where and how far they wish to go.   Both psychiatrists concluded I am fully transsexual and were happy to ‘take me all the way’. I’m not so sure. I’m not body dysphoric as far as my meat and two veg are concerned, in view of my age and recent bereavement I’m not seeking another partner, and neither am I gay so as Trines you might say I’m lesbian, so why would I want to lose my ‘wobbly bits’? I think I will be content to present myself as best I can as a woman even if I continue to have things in my knickers that other girls don’t have!  Provided I tuck no-one else will know whether I’ve had full reassignment or not.  What I want more than anything is feminising hormones so I can have effective facial and body hair removal and benefit from their desirable side-effects although at my age I cannot, unfortunately, expect oestrogen to give me any breast tissue   Meanwhile, I had to tell my three children and their families and then plan going fully public.   Whilst my wife ‘knew’ about me before we married, we agreed to keep it a secret from everyone for the protection both of our children and my wife from the substantial public opprobrium and ridicule they would have suffered, certainly back in the ‘70’s and ‘80’s. Indeed, on leaving home in the early 70’s I tried living full-time as a woman but had to give it up after 6 months because of the immense public hostility I suffered and the impossibility of getting a worthwhile job.   I now needed to inform my children of my condition and of my wish to ‘go public’. This would not be easy—and it wasn’t!  I paid for them to have quite expensive sessions with a counsellor experienced in transgender issues and this most definitely helped. All three of them are now fully supportive although my son, in particular, is still having trouble fully coming to terms with the ‘new’ me.  Fortunately there is a huge amount of love in my family and we will get there.   In 'Butch Biker Bitch' mode (Transtastic  photoshoot Feb 2015)   I have grandchildren by two of them and because they were all terribly upset by the death early last year of their granny, and they still are, my children do not want them to go through another bereavement because of the ‘loss’ of their granddad and neither do they want to risk them suffering cyber bullying so, for the time being at least, I have to be ‘granddad’ whenever I see them. I can do this wearing women’s shoes, trousers and tops so it is not too uncomfortable for me. It is a price I will pay if I have to.   With the children informed and ‘on board’ I was now, at long, long last  free to ‘go public’!  I had been planning this for several months as I wanted to try and ensure I would have the best possible result in terms of tolerance and acceptance by my local community.   I have lived in my fairly large village, population just over 2,000, for 15 years, 14 of those with my wife.  I have actively joined in with the local community, trying always to be nice to everyone, performing and directing with the drama society, secretary of the Twinning Association for many years, socialising in the four pubs, playing and umpiring for the cricket team, helping to organise village fetes etc.  In addition, I’ve always had a part-time job as deputy manager of the village’s very busy canal marina, selling boats and organising their big boat rallies and festivals. In addition, as a qualified Boat Master and passenger boat skipper, I give boat handling instruction throughout the inland waterways on my own account.   So I am very well known and, I like to think, well regarded  not only in the village but also through the large and widespread canal community. Coming out to all these many hundreds of people seemed to be a fearsome step to take, something I wasn’t sure I could manage.   I could of course always ‘cut and run’ by selling up, moving to a nice little house in a pleasant town somewhere, presenting myself immediately as Trines.  This way, I would not suffer any ridicule or shunning by people I knew. True. But the whole purpose of my fully transitioning was to be able to lead a full, entertaining and social life as Trines and to be accepted by and join in with my local community. If I moved away, I would not be known and, as an obvious transwoman, I would not make many new friends at all,.  I would be facing a rather lonely remainder of my life.   I didn’t struggle with this decision for very long, I bit the bullet and decided to openly disclose to my village; if it all went disastrously wrong then moving away would be my ‘Plan B’.   Family unity is so important to me I discussed every proposed step with my children and took on board all their suggestions. The doctor already knew, was professionally bound to secrecy and had got the NHS fully on side.   My next step was the vicar. I do have faith but for reasons I will not go into here had never attended the local church except for the occasional wedding and funeral. I knew her well through secular dealings and she had been fantastic over my wife’s funeral. I met her in male mode, told her I would like to start attending church services, that I wouldn’t mind singing in the choir (I knew they were desperately short and had no male voices at all) but there was just one tiny thing, I would be coming as a woman!  She was of course amazed by the news (my male persona is exceptionally masculine), bowled over by my photo’s and couldn’t wait to meet the real me which she did a few days later.   She was all for Trines being an active member of her congregation, brought her wardens confidentially on board for briefing on transgender matters so they could counsel any stroppy church members and got her bishop’s backing she could tell anyone who couldn’t freely accept me to clear off and find a different religion!  A target date of the first week in June was set and until then I would attend church and sing in the choir as a man and she would subliminally prepare everyone by seeding suitable comments about accepting and loving everyone regardless of their differences in the texts of her sermons, bidding prayers and in the Village News!   This now left me free to concentrate on my information leaflet. I had decided I would, the week before my transition, go round in drab to see every one of my friends and important acquaintances and tell them what I was proposing to do, show them some current and very historic photos if they wanted to see them, hope I could rely on their acceptance and continued friendship and leave them with an informative and illustrated leaflet which they could pass on to others if they wished.  This leaflet went through 6 or 7 draft stages and I was careful to include  things my children wanted said. I had 250 of these professionally printed on top quality, thick, glossy bi-folded A4  paper so they could easily withstand being passed around:- (if the type is too small to read, zoom in by pressing 'Ctrl' & '+' together):-   So the last week in May, the week before ‘D-Day’, arrived!   I went round telling all my friends and left them with a leaflet. I saw each pub licensee, leaving  half a dozen copies behind the bar as I was bound to be the village scandal for a few days and also got their promises that if any Neanderthals objected to my presence it would be them asked to leave the pub and not me. I had also booked a personal conference that week with my marina owner and his general manager. They had been on tenterhooks for weeks, fearful I was retiring or moving away. They seemed almost relieved when I told them Tony was becoming Trines, it was almost “Is that all? Thank God for that!” Subject to a private preview of the new me they were, as friends as well as equal opportunity employers, happy for me to continue in the role for them, dealing with the public. I’ve had to have new female uniforms bespoken as nothing off the peg was long enough and I made sure everything hugs my breast, waist and hips shapewear tightly. The office girls are green with envy as I look rather voluptuous and sexy—they have already demanded the same made to measure facility!   That Sunday I was not in church as I was managing the marina. The vicar took the opportunity of telling the congregation about me, how from the following week I would always be Trines,  and apparently spoke so beautifully and movingly on transgenderism  and why I should be embraced by them all,  there were quite a few damp eyes in the house. The wardens distributed my leaflets afterwards.    D - Day ! and its Aftermath   The following Monday, 1st June, Trines made her first public appearance in the village and Tony has never been seen since (except of course a couple of times down in London with the grandchildren).   Against all my fears and trepidation my public disclosure and transition has been an absolutely unbelievable success, beyond my wildest dreams.  I had told myself that if I could retain the goodwill of perhaps a third of my friends then that would be a good and acceptable result, making staying in the village worthwhile.  30%?  It’s greater than 100% as I now have more friends than before because of my transition!   People I’ve not seen before but who have read my leaflet or heard about me have been coming up in the street or pub to shake my hand, commend my bravery and to wish me luck!  I’ve had a rather nasty and emergency operation recently and news of this spread with the result that people, many of them my ’new’ friends, were falling over themselves, offering to drive me to and from hospital or to meet family at Rugby station and take them to visit me—a round trip of about 50 miles!   All my neighbours and friends are still very friendly, I can’t accept all the invites round for coffee etc, there are too many of them. I’m really welcome at church and am possibly the only lady bass in a church choir in the country! The church has put me on their fete committee and wants me to be the PA announcer and dog show commentator at the next one. I continue to work at the marina with no adverse feedback whatsoever from the public. I’ve recently been in charge of safety at the big annual historic boat rally, we get thousands of visitors each day, and had to go round telling loads of boat skippers and others what to do  (it’s like herding cats with them) - they all know me from previous years but if anything they were all nicer, friendlier and more compliant than they’ve ever been!  My boat training business has not dropped off in the slightest, no-one gives my transition a second thought when I inform them. The Twinning Association has asked me to prepare and present their next fund-raising quiz (a big annual event in the village). I’m cast in the next Players’ production, rehearsals start in September.  I’m very welcome in all four pubs and am never short of someone to chat to. I’ve been elected a member of a small, rather exclusive group of ladies who meet every few weeks to cattily swap the latest gossip and scandal whilst getting hammered on G&T!  I have even been asked if I would like to help out at the community-owned tea shop, serving coffee, cakes and conversation to villagers and passing boaters - which I will do after my current convalescence.   If anything my social life as Trines is better than it was for that person I used to be (what was his name?) and it wasn’t bad for him, so much so I think I am losing the need to meet up with my other trans friends as much as I used to. After all, there is nothing so satisfying as being accepted and socialised by ’normal’ people for the girl you are. I shall of course still get to Pink Punters occasionally as I will to Outskirts in Birmingham and come Hell or High Water I am definitely getting to Sparkle next year after it was so cruelly snatched from me this year by a cancerous tumour.   Those of you who’ve managed not to nod off but are still reading this and possibly thinking of transitioning yourselves at some time in the future, might like to have my views on why I think my public disclosure has been so successful.   1. I decided to brazen it out in the locality where I lived and was known, rather than move to a new location. Had it been necessary to move first then I might have delayed my local transition for a year or two so that I could get to know a fair number of people as a man. That would not, of course, have stopped me cross-dressing at home or from going out further afield in female mode.   2. I was well established and well-known in the locality, joined in community activities and, always trying to be a nice guy, I think I was generally well liked. Whilst having to come to terms with a friend’s transgenderism must be more difficult the better someone has known the person as a man, I think there may be that little more pressure to do so because they are a friend; if they were not or hardly known then, to avoid embarrassment or other difficulties I think people might be tempted to more or less ignore the trans, giving perhaps just a smile if meeting in the street.   3. I took my time and planned well!  I had been dressing almost every day since May 2014 at home and when out sight-seeing, shopping or socialising with other trans in towns near and far. I only presented as a man locally when I had to eg for a social function in my village or when I was working in the marina. By the end of the year the urge to go 24/7 was stronger than ever and I realised I had no option but to go for it and disclosed to my GP to get the GIC on my case. I then gave myself 6 months to prepare for ‘D-Day’ (‘Disclosure Day’).   Most reputable websites advise taking disclosure very slowly, telling only a few now, a few more in a couple of weeks and so on. This would not have suited my circumstances. It would have been highly confusing for villagers - and for me - to see me switching between Trines and Tony on a daily basis; it would have to be all, and this would be on 1st June. I brought the vicar on board for genuine reasons but she also was a sounding-board; if she and her wardens had been decidedly ‘iffy’ about it all I probably would have sounded out again with a friend on whom I could rely for discretion or possibly have decided to switch to Plan B (ie ‘cut & run’).   4. I prepared and distributed an information leaflet.   I had tremendously complimentary feedback; many thought this had been a master-stroke. Even a lot of my better educated friends confessed to knowing little or nothing about transgenderism despite the number of high profile cases reported in the press over recent months. They said they thought they would have been much less sympathetic over my situation and proposed actions had they not been able to read and think about it. Some said they would have simply put me down as a ’perv’!  My history dating back to age 4 was genuinely eye-opening to them and made them really want to help me through my transition. It also worked on people who did not know me.  I distributed just under 250 but I know a lot were passed around and perhaps some 500 villagers or more have seen and been quite affected by it. I strongly recommend anyone thinking of transitioning to prepare a similar leaflet.   5. Once I publicly transitioned I really ‘put myself about’.  I realised I would need to socialise as much as I could to reinforce my presence as Trines in the village and to get villagers talking to me. I made sure I visited each pub each week at a peak time. I attended village do’s, some of which I would never have gone to previously, just to make sure I was seen and for the chance to chat to others. I went on more walks around the village, canal and marina in order to meet lots of others. I invited many to my place for a coffee and chat which they either agreed to or invited me to theirs instead.  I will take this up again as soon as my convalescence permits me and rather nicely, I’ve had quite a few offers to mow my lawns and do other heavy household chores.   The inhabitants of my village have really come up trumps; their generosity of spirit has been truly humbling particularly when you consider that at 6ft 3in without heels (and I always wear heels!) a large, wide frame and a profoundly deep voice, I cannot easily 'pass'.   Whether, in view of my cancer, I will ever be allowed feminising hormones or will ever be offered re-assignment surgery has now paled into insignificance for me now that I am living and being widely accepted as the person I am.   I sincerely hope all other girls who publicly transition have family, friends and neighbours as lovely as mine to deal with.   All my love   x x  
    26 Posted by Trines x x
  • Preparing for “D-Day” (“D” for “Disclosure”)   Stratford on Avon  May 2015  After Christmas I decided I was going to live out the rest of my life as a woman on a 24/7 basis.  I’m 70 next year and it was ‘now or never’.  For nearly 9 months I had been living as a woman at home and when out and about in the nearby towns but had not ‘come out’ to my friends and acquaintances in the village where I live.   I went dressed as a man when I disclosed my transgenderism to my (lady) doctor but took some photos with me, some dating back more than 50 years, so I could satisfy her this wasn’t just a recent phenomenon and that I hadn’t gone doolally because of my wife’s death early last year.   She was bowled over by the photos and asked me if I would give her make-up lessons so she could look 20 years younger too!    She immediately acceded to my request for a referral to the gender identity clinic (GIC) but then she had no option really, as there are strict NHS protocols and guidelines concerning transgender matters. As luck would have it, my local GIC was immediately next door in the ‘cottage’ hospital on the same campus as my doctor’s surgery; wasn’t I a lucky girl?  This hasn’t quickened up in the slightest the inordinately slow GIC process though.   She also changed my male name on the NHS records to that of my unofficially adopted female name and the NHS now only knows me as a female named Ms Trines Ward. All correspondence comes in that name. Any male doctor wishing to examine me must wheel in a female chaperone for my protection!  Recently I had an emergency operation and the hospital kept insisting I had to be put in a female ward; I only just managed to avoid this as I felt ill women and their visitors would not want to see me in the next bed without wig or make-up! In the male ward I wore androgynous pink and blue short pyjamas but the board above my bed clearly stated ‘Ms Trines Ward—female” as did the labels around my arm and ankle, and the staff punctiliously referred to me amongst staff and patients, as ‘she’ or ‘her’.   Back at the GIC, they informed me it was run by two psychiatrists and I would need a separate assessment consultation with each one before any treatment would be considered. There was a four months’ wait for each session which meant nothing could even begin to happen until October/November!  I thought this was completely out of order and I thoroughly read the two main published guidelines (both are on the net):   1. “Good practice guidelines for the assessment and treatment of adults with gender dysphoria” ref CR181 published by Royal College of Pyschiatrists Oct 2013   2) “Gender dysphoria services: a guide for General Practitioners and other healthcare staff” published by NHS.   These showed me my GIC’s timescales did not comply and some polite but firm letters and phone calls from me got the waits reduced to two months each; still lengthy but within the guidelines.  I can understand caution when dealing with tyros in their late teens/early twenties who might not even have ventured out dressed in public but not when dealing with very long in the tooth, fully experienced trans like me who know precisely where and how far they wish to go.   Both psychiatrists concluded I am fully transsexual and were happy to ‘take me all the way’. I’m not so sure. I’m not body dysphoric as far as my meat and two veg are concerned, in view of my age and recent bereavement I’m not seeking another partner, and neither am I gay so as Trines you might say I’m lesbian, so why would I want to lose my ‘wobbly bits’? I think I will be content to present myself as best I can as a woman even if I continue to have things in my knickers that other girls don’t have!  Provided I tuck no-one else will know whether I’ve had full reassignment or not.  What I want more than anything is feminising hormones so I can have effective facial and body hair removal and benefit from their desirable side-effects although at my age I cannot, unfortunately, expect oestrogen to give me any breast tissue   Meanwhile, I had to tell my three children and their families and then plan going fully public.   Whilst my wife ‘knew’ about me before we married, we agreed to keep it a secret from everyone for the protection both of our children and my wife from the substantial public opprobrium and ridicule they would have suffered, certainly back in the ‘70’s and ‘80’s. Indeed, on leaving home in the early 70’s I tried living full-time as a woman but had to give it up after 6 months because of the immense public hostility I suffered and the impossibility of getting a worthwhile job.   I now needed to inform my children of my condition and of my wish to ‘go public’. This would not be easy—and it wasn’t!  I paid for them to have quite expensive sessions with a counsellor experienced in transgender issues and this most definitely helped. All three of them are now fully supportive although my son, in particular, is still having trouble fully coming to terms with the ‘new’ me.  Fortunately there is a huge amount of love in my family and we will get there.   In 'Butch Biker Bitch' mode (Transtastic  photoshoot Feb 2015)   I have grandchildren by two of them and because they were all terribly upset by the death early last year of their granny, and they still are, my children do not want them to go through another bereavement because of the ‘loss’ of their granddad and neither do they want to risk them suffering cyber bullying so, for the time being at least, I have to be ‘granddad’ whenever I see them. I can do this wearing women’s shoes, trousers and tops so it is not too uncomfortable for me. It is a price I will pay if I have to.   With the children informed and ‘on board’ I was now, at long, long last  free to ‘go public’!  I had been planning this for several months as I wanted to try and ensure I would have the best possible result in terms of tolerance and acceptance by my local community.   I have lived in my fairly large village, population just over 2,000, for 15 years, 14 of those with my wife.  I have actively joined in with the local community, trying always to be nice to everyone, performing and directing with the drama society, secretary of the Twinning Association for many years, socialising in the four pubs, playing and umpiring for the cricket team, helping to organise village fetes etc.  In addition, I’ve always had a part-time job as deputy manager of the village’s very busy canal marina, selling boats and organising their big boat rallies and festivals. In addition, as a qualified Boat Master and passenger boat skipper, I give boat handling instruction throughout the inland waterways on my own account.   So I am very well known and, I like to think, well regarded  not only in the village but also through the large and widespread canal community. Coming out to all these many hundreds of people seemed to be a fearsome step to take, something I wasn’t sure I could manage.   I could of course always ‘cut and run’ by selling up, moving to a nice little house in a pleasant town somewhere, presenting myself immediately as Trines.  This way, I would not suffer any ridicule or shunning by people I knew. True. But the whole purpose of my fully transitioning was to be able to lead a full, entertaining and social life as Trines and to be accepted by and join in with my local community. If I moved away, I would not be known and, as an obvious transwoman, I would not make many new friends at all,.  I would be facing a rather lonely remainder of my life.   I didn’t struggle with this decision for very long, I bit the bullet and decided to openly disclose to my village; if it all went disastrously wrong then moving away would be my ‘Plan B’.   Family unity is so important to me I discussed every proposed step with my children and took on board all their suggestions. The doctor already knew, was professionally bound to secrecy and had got the NHS fully on side.   My next step was the vicar. I do have faith but for reasons I will not go into here had never attended the local church except for the occasional wedding and funeral. I knew her well through secular dealings and she had been fantastic over my wife’s funeral. I met her in male mode, told her I would like to start attending church services, that I wouldn’t mind singing in the choir (I knew they were desperately short and had no male voices at all) but there was just one tiny thing, I would be coming as a woman!  She was of course amazed by the news (my male persona is exceptionally masculine), bowled over by my photo’s and couldn’t wait to meet the real me which she did a few days later.   She was all for Trines being an active member of her congregation, brought her wardens confidentially on board for briefing on transgender matters so they could counsel any stroppy church members and got her bishop’s backing she could tell anyone who couldn’t freely accept me to clear off and find a different religion!  A target date of the first week in June was set and until then I would attend church and sing in the choir as a man and she would subliminally prepare everyone by seeding suitable comments about accepting and loving everyone regardless of their differences in the texts of her sermons, bidding prayers and in the Village News!   This now left me free to concentrate on my information leaflet. I had decided I would, the week before my transition, go round in drab to see every one of my friends and important acquaintances and tell them what I was proposing to do, show them some current and very historic photos if they wanted to see them, hope I could rely on their acceptance and continued friendship and leave them with an informative and illustrated leaflet which they could pass on to others if they wished.  This leaflet went through 6 or 7 draft stages and I was careful to include  things my children wanted said. I had 250 of these professionally printed on top quality, thick, glossy bi-folded A4  paper so they could easily withstand being passed around:- (if the type is too small to read, zoom in by pressing 'Ctrl' & '+' together):-   So the last week in May, the week before ‘D-Day’, arrived!   I went round telling all my friends and left them with a leaflet. I saw each pub licensee, leaving  half a dozen copies behind the bar as I was bound to be the village scandal for a few days and also got their promises that if any Neanderthals objected to my presence it would be them asked to leave the pub and not me. I had also booked a personal conference that week with my marina owner and his general manager. They had been on tenterhooks for weeks, fearful I was retiring or moving away. They seemed almost relieved when I told them Tony was becoming Trines, it was almost “Is that all? Thank God for that!” Subject to a private preview of the new me they were, as friends as well as equal opportunity employers, happy for me to continue in the role for them, dealing with the public. I’ve had to have new female uniforms bespoken as nothing off the peg was long enough and I made sure everything hugs my breast, waist and hips shapewear tightly. The office girls are green with envy as I look rather voluptuous and sexy—they have already demanded the same made to measure facility!   That Sunday I was not in church as I was managing the marina. The vicar took the opportunity of telling the congregation about me, how from the following week I would always be Trines,  and apparently spoke so beautifully and movingly on transgenderism  and why I should be embraced by them all,  there were quite a few damp eyes in the house. The wardens distributed my leaflets afterwards.    D - Day ! and its Aftermath   The following Monday, 1st June, Trines made her first public appearance in the village and Tony has never been seen since (except of course a couple of times down in London with the grandchildren).   Against all my fears and trepidation my public disclosure and transition has been an absolutely unbelievable success, beyond my wildest dreams.  I had told myself that if I could retain the goodwill of perhaps a third of my friends then that would be a good and acceptable result, making staying in the village worthwhile.  30%?  It’s greater than 100% as I now have more friends than before because of my transition!   People I’ve not seen before but who have read my leaflet or heard about me have been coming up in the street or pub to shake my hand, commend my bravery and to wish me luck!  I’ve had a rather nasty and emergency operation recently and news of this spread with the result that people, many of them my ’new’ friends, were falling over themselves, offering to drive me to and from hospital or to meet family at Rugby station and take them to visit me—a round trip of about 50 miles!   All my neighbours and friends are still very friendly, I can’t accept all the invites round for coffee etc, there are too many of them. I’m really welcome at church and am possibly the only lady bass in a church choir in the country! The church has put me on their fete committee and wants me to be the PA announcer and dog show commentator at the next one. I continue to work at the marina with no adverse feedback whatsoever from the public. I’ve recently been in charge of safety at the big annual historic boat rally, we get thousands of visitors each day, and had to go round telling loads of boat skippers and others what to do  (it’s like herding cats with them) - they all know me from previous years but if anything they were all nicer, friendlier and more compliant than they’ve ever been!  My boat training business has not dropped off in the slightest, no-one gives my transition a second thought when I inform them. The Twinning Association has asked me to prepare and present their next fund-raising quiz (a big annual event in the village). I’m cast in the next Players’ production, rehearsals start in September.  I’m very welcome in all four pubs and am never short of someone to chat to. I’ve been elected a member of a small, rather exclusive group of ladies who meet every few weeks to cattily swap the latest gossip and scandal whilst getting hammered on G&T!  I have even been asked if I would like to help out at the community-owned tea shop, serving coffee, cakes and conversation to villagers and passing boaters - which I will do after my current convalescence.   If anything my social life as Trines is better than it was for that person I used to be (what was his name?) and it wasn’t bad for him, so much so I think I am losing the need to meet up with my other trans friends as much as I used to. After all, there is nothing so satisfying as being accepted and socialised by ’normal’ people for the girl you are. I shall of course still get to Pink Punters occasionally as I will to Outskirts in Birmingham and come Hell or High Water I am definitely getting to Sparkle next year after it was so cruelly snatched from me this year by a cancerous tumour.   Those of you who’ve managed not to nod off but are still reading this and possibly thinking of transitioning yourselves at some time in the future, might like to have my views on why I think my public disclosure has been so successful.   1. I decided to brazen it out in the locality where I lived and was known, rather than move to a new location. Had it been necessary to move first then I might have delayed my local transition for a year or two so that I could get to know a fair number of people as a man. That would not, of course, have stopped me cross-dressing at home or from going out further afield in female mode.   2. I was well established and well-known in the locality, joined in community activities and, always trying to be a nice guy, I think I was generally well liked. Whilst having to come to terms with a friend’s transgenderism must be more difficult the better someone has known the person as a man, I think there may be that little more pressure to do so because they are a friend; if they were not or hardly known then, to avoid embarrassment or other difficulties I think people might be tempted to more or less ignore the trans, giving perhaps just a smile if meeting in the street.   3. I took my time and planned well!  I had been dressing almost every day since May 2014 at home and when out sight-seeing, shopping or socialising with other trans in towns near and far. I only presented as a man locally when I had to eg for a social function in my village or when I was working in the marina. By the end of the year the urge to go 24/7 was stronger than ever and I realised I had no option but to go for it and disclosed to my GP to get the GIC on my case. I then gave myself 6 months to prepare for ‘D-Day’ (‘Disclosure Day’).   Most reputable websites advise taking disclosure very slowly, telling only a few now, a few more in a couple of weeks and so on. This would not have suited my circumstances. It would have been highly confusing for villagers - and for me - to see me switching between Trines and Tony on a daily basis; it would have to be all, and this would be on 1st June. I brought the vicar on board for genuine reasons but she also was a sounding-board; if she and her wardens had been decidedly ‘iffy’ about it all I probably would have sounded out again with a friend on whom I could rely for discretion or possibly have decided to switch to Plan B (ie ‘cut & run’).   4. I prepared and distributed an information leaflet.   I had tremendously complimentary feedback; many thought this had been a master-stroke. Even a lot of my better educated friends confessed to knowing little or nothing about transgenderism despite the number of high profile cases reported in the press over recent months. They said they thought they would have been much less sympathetic over my situation and proposed actions had they not been able to read and think about it. Some said they would have simply put me down as a ’perv’!  My history dating back to age 4 was genuinely eye-opening to them and made them really want to help me through my transition. It also worked on people who did not know me.  I distributed just under 250 but I know a lot were passed around and perhaps some 500 villagers or more have seen and been quite affected by it. I strongly recommend anyone thinking of transitioning to prepare a similar leaflet.   5. Once I publicly transitioned I really ‘put myself about’.  I realised I would need to socialise as much as I could to reinforce my presence as Trines in the village and to get villagers talking to me. I made sure I visited each pub each week at a peak time. I attended village do’s, some of which I would never have gone to previously, just to make sure I was seen and for the chance to chat to others. I went on more walks around the village, canal and marina in order to meet lots of others. I invited many to my place for a coffee and chat which they either agreed to or invited me to theirs instead.  I will take this up again as soon as my convalescence permits me and rather nicely, I’ve had quite a few offers to mow my lawns and do other heavy household chores.   The inhabitants of my village have really come up trumps; their generosity of spirit has been truly humbling particularly when you consider that at 6ft 3in without heels (and I always wear heels!) a large, wide frame and a profoundly deep voice, I cannot easily 'pass'.   Whether, in view of my cancer, I will ever be allowed feminising hormones or will ever be offered re-assignment surgery has now paled into insignificance for me now that I am living and being widely accepted as the person I am.   I sincerely hope all other girls who publicly transition have family, friends and neighbours as lovely as mine to deal with.   All my love   x x  
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